Clues written by M. Woolf
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VHCsHCs Hons
points
First
mention
Latest
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Career
span
M. Woolf6035528468May 1950Jun 198737y 1m
 
 Clue wordAwardClueExplanation
1984-1985
657SILLY-BILLYVHCWill he be close to bats? Will, frequently!silly + Billy & lit.
1983-1984
618CRETISMVHCIt’s a strange miscreant who is innocent of oneanag. less an & lit.
607CARNEYVHCThe cold and the shivering yearn for flannelc + anag.
581SPADROON def. MAVERICK (Wrong Number)VHCSteel – take SDP or no – a Liberaltake; anag. SDP or no a
1981-1982
517IMMORTELLEVHCCan you see me rot? Me? I’ll flourishanag. & lit.
508POSTURE-MAKERVHCFor all to see – Pom streaker running around – one could have dislocated neck!U in anag.; ref. incident at Twickenham
504SIMMENTHALERSecondHarm Nestlé? Absurd! I’m providing an essential ingredientI’m in anag. & lit.
1978-1979
332NUT-CASEVHCCan’t use potty? Must be cracked!anag.
1977-1978
310STERNFASTVHCTies up RN – sets aftanag. & lit.
306DICKENSVHCWrote a Cricket Book: ‘Snicked Through The Slips’anag.; ref. ‘Cricket on the Hearth’
301TROLLOPISHVHCPosh? Rot! I’ll be damned if I am!anag. & lit.
1976-1977
243OLYMPICVHCSuch a committee should have a fixed policy about lead in medalsm in anag.
221PADDY-WHACKSecondIt’s madness to swipe – you’ll get a ruddy duckpaddy whack; r.d., meaning in O.E.D
1975-1976
174EPEOLATRYFirstWith parole yet to be arranged, could this mean serving whole sentences?anag.; serve = worship
1974-1975
139PIEPOWDERVHCChap on the road who needs something to eat and something to keep drypie1, powder; chap = chapman
1973-1974
62SOLITAIRESVHCDiamonds offered to birds for indoor games – should make the permissive sort liaiseanag.
Ximenes competitions
1970-1971
1119RONDE (Printer’s Devilry)VHCYoung Louis recognised the Cardinal’s hat—red, of f/ursfrondeurs; Louis XIV, Mazarin
1110IMPERSONATEVHCTry to take off more—a step-in will fit if you reduceanag.
1969-1970
1071ORACLE (Printer’s Devilry)VHCWith a “la, te, do, so, me”, finish on tonic “f/a, re”. Yes—just what’s wanted 
1966-1967
916DIAPASONVHCI may be used with pedal-point for instance in the swellI a p(edal) as, all in don1 & lit.
1965-1966
894WITENAGEMOTFirstWessex leaders used to hold it; beginning of Norman era saw its endit in We + N age mot, & lit.
1964-1965
856RODOMONTADEVHCA little instant deodorant sprinkled around forms a vapourmo in anag.
1963-1964
780NOBLEST (and Eximenamination)VHCExim: 13
1962-1963
721KERB-MERCHANTVHCPolice move me on, making me branch off and trek aimlessly aroundanag. in anag.
1960-1961
626WOMAN-TIREDVHCMr. Bumble was so dame-worn—it hurt!anag. & lit.; ref. David Copperfield
617COLOPHONYFirstThe finishing touch to Yehudi’s bowcolophon Y, & lit.; ref. Y. Menuhin; bow3 = forepart
608CUSTOMERVHCThere’s a lot of use to me in a little credit!us(e) to me in cr & lit.
600The Light Brigade, noble Six Hundred (Anagram)VHCExalt high this bold enduring breed! 
1959-1960
573SCAPEGALLOWSVHCFree wall-spaces go to show evidence of hanging-committee’s incompetenceanag.
1958-1959
519RIDICULE (DLM)VHCW. a guy on an idle cruiser and the dentist on an oil-carrier?
One’s a Yank at anchor, the other’s a tanker yanker
 
504LEAD-LINEVHCI give guidance to the route—all I need is to be castlead line, anag., & lit.
1957-1958
482LEASING-MAKERVHCFor insurrection’s sake—maligneranag. & lit.
1956-1957
408BILLETVHCThe situation is—the Britsh, to keep extreme elements of Israel and Egypt apart, take a little latitudeB + l in I(srae)l, E(gyp)t; l = latitude; ref. Suez crisis
386CLEITHRALVHCOpening pair, making 150, hit runs in real abandon—that’s the kind of stand appreciated at Old Trafford!CL + anag. of hit real; ref. rainy cricket ground
1954 (2)
306CHICANE / RAMPART (Right and Left)VHCTaking a chance, I swerved to dodge the wall—hit a buggy—overturnedanag.; ram + trap (rev.)
304ORLEANSVHCTown with the ill-fated Sorel an inhabitantanag. & lit.; ref. Agnès S., mistress of Charles VII
291APAGOGEVHCWith this I pass to the answer by exposing the lie of the oppositeego gap a. (all rev.), & lit.
285PARALYSESVHCAs parleys break down, you’ll see what a rail-strike does!anag.
1954 (1)
271TRIPLETVHCPresumably a tiny flock of birds trillingi.e triplet = little trip2; trilling = one of 3 triplets
259AGANIPPEVHCWell! What a big mouth to swallow such a little drink!nip in a gape
1953 (2)
257PYROTECHNICS (Straight Clue)VHCMusical show with a cast of coloured stars 
255SCUTTLEVHCWay to hold a tailless lizardscuttle(r); “the striped lizard” in contemporary ed. of C.
245GLAMOUR / SOPRANO (Right and Left)VHCThe attraction of a Peach Melba, perhaps, is the top partcryptic def.; 2 mngs.; ref. Dame Nellie M.
241MANDOLINEVHCForever being picked at, I have the hump and fretcryptic def.; fret2
239GENISTA (Printer’s Devilry)VHCThis fish packed by “Canneries Inc.” open ha/sty!Copenhagen
1953 (1)
207PAGEANTSecond“The Lord Mayor’s Show is one long-outmoded hold-up.” Workerpage2 ant; ref. newspaper “Daily Worker”
1952 (2)
201AMETHYSTVHCMeat pie, and by Harry it’ll take a good man to finish it—it’s a mauve one!anag. + Hy + St
199HONESTYVHCIt’s fine, but where does it get you, eh? Stony broke!anag.
198THIRDVHCMcDonald Bailey was inclined to be serious about the 200 metrescryptic def.; ref. McD. B., third in 1952 Olympics and wavelength of BBC Third Programme
197SCALESVHCWith a little schooling you can make a performing seal balance dishessc(hooling) + anag.
1952 (1)
189SALTIREVHCX is enough to make the ordinary realist barmy!anag.; heraldic mng. of ordinary (n)
185STOUTVHCIt looks black. Butler brings it home to the rich with reduced sterling allowance abroadSt. + out; ref. Wm. Butler & Co.’s stout, and R. A. Butler’s Jan 1952 proposal to reduce the travel allowance from £50 to £25
184MEREST / WYOMING (DLM)SecondTo secure a state of union, I spread “Wigloo” on my wig-lining. Containing purest gum, it never blisters me 
1951 (2)
173HATCHINGVHCThe shell’s a thing of fragments, chick’s head appears; it’s coming out!ch(ick’s) in anag. of a thing & lit.
1951 (1)
167PARMESANVHCJust a smear, melted in the pan, makes a delicious savouryanag. in pan
165CABBAGEVHCWhen pickled it’s best to take, steal or otherwise beg a cabanag., 2 defs.; cabbage1,2
163LORICATESecond“It’s safer this way” said the Knight. “Rot!” Alice retortedanag.; retorted (heraldic). = interlaced; ref. “Through the Looking-Glass”
1950 (2)
139HECATOMBVHCHundred head of beef offered at great sacrifice. Could let you have them B.O.A.C.anag.; sacrifice of 100 cattle (Brewer); ref. airline

 
HCs awarded to M. Woolf
Clues  |  Annual Honours   |  Other competitors

1987-1988
  788 CROW
 
1986-1987
  762 OBELISE
  753 SHEEPDOG
  740 ESCADRILLE
 
1985-1986
  727 WELL-TO-DO
  722 SUPERNACULUM
  696 ANTIMNEMONIC
  688 CUCURBITAL
 
1984-1985
  675 CONSTERNATE
  644 EASY STREET (or STAPELIA)
 
1983-1984
  615 HISTORIETTE
  600 Into the jaws of Death / Into the mouth of Hell (Anagram)
  594 DOINGS
 
1981-1982
  506 ELANET (Printer’s Devilry)
 
1980-1981
  469 APLUSTRE
  426 MISL(E)ADING (Letters Latent)
 
1978-1979
  349 ODDCOMESHORT
 
1977-1978
  289 AMNESIAC
  276 AMTRACK
  263 ERIACH (Printer’s Devilry)
  259 TRANSIRE
 
1976-1977
  229 METRICATE
 
1975-1976
  203 BOGY
  195 SHILLY-SHALLY
 
1974-1975
  130 EADISH (Printer’s Devilry)
 
Ximenes competitions
 
1970-1971
  1127 TRAYBIT
 
1968-1969
  1049 SLANGWHANGER
  1036 CORONETED
 
1967-1968
  980 OMNIBUSES
 
1966-1967
  935 MALAPROP
  929 AMPHITHEATRE
  920 ARISTATE (Printer’s Devilry)
 
1965-1966
  902 WINCOPIPE
  900 PARAMECIA or PAREOEANS
 
1964-1965
  847 FRENETICAL
  834 CARRIED
 
1963-1964
  773 FIT-OUT
  764 SHIMMY-SHAKE
 
1962-1963
  738 ANAESTHETIC
  730 ARCH-PIRATE
  728 ALDERMA(N) (N’s missing in def.) (Letters Latent)
  725 SILENUS
  708 HEARTS
 
1961-1962
  694 OSIRIS (Printer’s Devilry)
  647 MADCAP
 
1960-1961
  638 BUREAUCRAT
 
1959-1960
  590 STATANT (Printer’s Devilry)
  586 HEBDOMADARY
  569 PROPOSAL
  547 STORMY
 
1958-1959
  529 BUTTY-COLLIER
  517 CAROTID
  495 PARTISAN
 
1957-1958
  469 DAISY
  451 MEGAPODE
  447 TOUSLE
  443 HALF-SEAS-OVER
 
1956-1957
  434 CARTON
  421 DOVETAIL
  415 When the snow lay round about (Anagram)
  404 POLENTA
  395 SCALE-ARMOUR
 
1955-1956
  377 MALISON
  369 BERET
  364 HELLEBORE
  351 LUSTRE
 
1954 (1)
  283 SOBER
  277 PRODIGALLY
  275 ESTOVER (Printer’s Devilry)
  273 COUSIN
  263 We think so then and we thought so still! (Anagram)
 
1953 (2)
  247 VAMPIRE
  243 LODESTAR
 
1953 (1)
  219 SOCIALIST
  209 ELAPSION def. IMPERIAL (Wrong Number)
 
1952 (2)
  206 PIEPOWDER
  205 CANTANKEROUS
  203 WEATHERS
  202 SPALPEEN
  200 ACCOUNT
 
1952 (1)
  191 DENIGRATE
  183 SAUSAGES
 
1951 (1)
  166 RACHIDES
 
1950 (2)
  135 STRIPPED
 


Annual Honours record of M. Woolf
Clues  |  HCs   |  Other competitors
YearPrizes
(1, 2, 3)
VHCsHCsPosition
1987-19880 0 1
1986-19870 0 3
1985-19860 0 4
1984-19850 1 2
1983-19840 3 3
 
1981-19821 (0, 1, 0) 2 1 19
1980-19810 0 2
 
1978-19790 1 1
1977-19780 3 4
1976-19771 (0, 1, 0) 1 1
1975-19761 (1, 0, 0) 0 2
1974-19750 1 1
1973-19740 1 0
 
Ximenes competitions
1970-19710 2 1
1969-19700 1 0
1968-19690 0 2
1967-19680 0 1
1966-19670 1 3
1965-19661 (1, 0, 0) 0 2
1964-19650 1 2
1963-19640 1 2
1962-19630 1 5
1961-19620 0 2
1960-19611 (1, 0, 0) 3 1 8
1959-19600 1 4
1958-19590 2 3
1957-19580 1 4
1956-19570 2 5
1955-19560 0 4
1954 (2)0 4 0 14
1954 (1)0 2 5
1953 (2)0 5 2 9
1953 (1)1 (0, 1, 0) 0 2
1952 (2)0 4 5 13
1952 (1)1 (0, 1, 0) 2 2 14
1951 (2)0 1 0
1951 (1)1 (0, 1, 0) 2 1 15
1950 (2)0 1 1